Flying Solo – Editor’s Scraps

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There is a scrap cabinet in every frame shop I know. Why? Because leftovers are often gems and full of profitable inspiration. Here's something I've learned:

There is a scrap cabinet in every frame shop I know. Why? Because leftovers are often gems and full of profitable inspiration. Here's something I've learned:

Flying Solo It's what we work toward and dream of--being our own boss and no longer having anyone tell us what to do. It's the symbol of freedom and achievement, right? Maybe. But not if we really want to succeed in business, or in life.

Flying solo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I recently heard Rachel Dexheimer speak on the Deadly Sins of Dying Businesses. I'm not much for negatives, but this one resonated with me. Never fly solo! She suggested creating your personal board of directors for guidance and support.

When I bought my business, I was an excellent framer, had some corporate experience, a B.A. degree and was 30 years old. I didn't need anyone. I had learned from others' mistakes and was already successful. I was sure I could thrive on my own.

Looking back, I see my view was narrow and it kept my business small. My vision has widened and there has been so much growth since I reached beyond myself. One of my richest resources is my fellow members of the EPFG.

Relationships with others like myself reveal working ideas, expose money-wasters, connect me to better suppliers, and help with everything from accounting to where best to recycle scrap. You too can see what is already working and implement it in your own way.

More importantly, these colleagues give you encouragement when you're struggling and a reality check when you're investing too much in a pie in the sky. You can get some of these things from your business neighbors and  friends, but none will understand in the way other framers and art sellers will relate to you.

Whoever you decide to reach out to or bring into your circle, it is vital to connect! Internet info is useful, but there's so much more to be learned in even a short conversation with another person who's been there. And it's good for the soul.

-Sheri J. Kennedy, Editor

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